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Dar es Salaam (from Arabic: دار السلام‎ Dār as-Salām, “the house of peace”; formerly Mzizima) is the former capital as well as the most populous city in Tanzania and a regionally important economic centre. Located on the Swahili coast, the city is one of the fastest growing cities in the world. Until 1974, Dar es Salaam served as Tanzania’s capital city, at which point the capital city commenced transferring to Dodoma, which was officially completed in 1996. However, as of 2017, it continues to remain a focus of central government bureaucracy, although this is in the process of fully moving to Dodoma. In addition, it is Tanzania’s most prominent city in arts, fashion, media, music, film and television and a leading financial centre, with the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) being the country’s first and most important stock exchange market. The city is the leading arrival and departure point for most tourists who visit Tanzania, including the national parks for safaris and the islands of Unguja and Pemba. Dar es Salaam is also the largest and most populous Swahili-speaking city in the world. The Tanzania Ports Authority (TPA, under construction ) and PSPF Pension Twin Towers both in the background are the tallest in East and Central Africa. It is the capital of the co-extensive Dar es Salaam Region, which is one of Tanzania’s 31 administrative regions and consists of five districts: Kinondoni in the north, Ilala in the centre, Ubungo, Temeke in the south and Kigamboni in the east across the Kurasini creek. The region had a population of 4,364,541 as of the official 2012 census.

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Currency

Economy

Dar es Salaam is Tanzania’s most important city for both business and government. The city contains high concentrations of trade and other services and manufacturing compared to other parts of Tanzania, which has about 80 percent of its population in rural areas. Downtown includes small businesses, many of which are run by traders and proprietors whose families originated from the Middle East and Indian sub-continent—areas of the world with which the settlements of the Tanzanian coast have had long-standing trading relations. The Dar es Salaam Central Business District is made up of Kisutu, Kivukoni, Upanga and Kariakoo areas is Tanzania’s largest city CBD. All three areas making up the downtown are found in the Ilala district. Kivukoni has the city’s important fish market, the Magogoni fish market. Kivukoni also is the place where the Tanzania’s central bank, The Bank of Tanzania is located, so is the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange. Kisutu has businesses and offices and is the location of Dar es Salaam central railway station, the PSPF Towers and the TPA tower.

Food

Due in part to the growth of the expatriate community and the increasing importance of tourism, the number of international restaurants has risen rapidly. The city offers a diversity of cuisine, ranging from traditional Tanzanian Barbecue-style options, such as Nyama Choma(Roasted meat—served with rice or ugali) and Mishkaki (Shish kebab—usually barbecued and served with salt, hot chili peppers, chapati, fries, and rice on the side), as well as the long-established traditional Indian and Zanzibari cuisine, to options from all corners of the globe, including Arab, Chinese, Thai, Turkish, Italian, and Japanese food. People who prefer neither fast food nor traditional restaurants buy their food from street vendors, who usually sell food at low prices. Samosas (sambusas) with coconut chutney are the most common snack street food items within the city, as the area is largely influenced by the fresh food products and spices imported from India.

Government

Globalization

Dar es Salaam is the city in Tanzania to which villagers flock for better opportunities. Westerners and Asians are also settling in Dar es Salaam, and the surge of foreigners has put pressure on local officials to develop policies better accommodating the growing diverse population of the city and its suburbs.

 

Language

 

Transport

Dar es Salaam has had a major construction boom. The PSPF Twin Towers with more than 35 stories is the tallest building in the city and the country. Dar es Salaam has major infrastructural challenges, including an outdated transport system and occasional power rationing.

Transportation

The Dar Rapid Transit (DART) is a bus-based mass transit system connecting the suburbs of Dar es Salaam to the central business district On a natural harbour on the Indian Ocean, it is the hub of the Tanzanian transportation system as the main railways and several highways originate in or near the city.

Local public transport

The most common form of transport in Dar es Salaam are the public buses, called dala dala, which are often found at the major bus terminals of Makumbusho and Ubungo. Since the introduction of motorcycle transit business known as “Bodaboda”, most of the people prefer this type of transportation which allows them to get into the city faster compared to the minibuses which face a lot of traffic. Other types of transport include motorcycles and Bajaj.

Bus

The government has been introducing a bus rapid transport or metro bus system under the Dar es Salaam bus rapid transit meaning ‘mwendo kasi’ in Kiswahili. The metro buses are managed by UDA (Usafiri Dar es Salaam). The bus rapid transit system Phase 1 is completed and already in operation by the Dar es Salaam Rapid Transit Agency, a government-private sector entity, and began operation on 10 May 2016. It is branded as UDA-RT (Usafiri Dar es Salaam Rapid Transit). The first section runs between Kimara in the northwest to Kivukoni on the northern headland of the harbour. Phase 1 was funded by the World Bank, African Development Bank and the Tanzanian government.

Ferry

The MV Kigamboni ferries running between south east Kivukoni to north west Kigamboni in south east Dar es Salaam MV Kigamboni ferries are running between south east of Kivukoni and north west of Kigamboni in Dar es Salaam.

Railway

The Dar es Salaam commuter rail is an urban and suburban commuter rail network serving the commercial city of Dar es Salaam. The city also hosts the head office of Tanzania Zambia Railways Authority (TAZARA) built in the late 1960s to early 1970s. The main terminal is located west of Dar es Salaam’s central business district in north Yombo Vituka along Nelson Mandela road. It also hosts the offices and infrastructures of the Central Railway Line (Operated by Tanzania Railways Authority, TRL) both railways are used to commute within the city during the day to ease traffic congestion in the already overcrowded roads during peak hours. Tanzania Railways operates the Central Line from Dar es Salaam to Kigoma. The TAZARA Railway connects Dar es Salaam to Zambia.

Airport

The Julius Nyerere International Airport, Dar es Salaam

The Julius Nyerere International Airport is the principal airport serving the country with two operating terminals and one under construction; Terminal Three at Kipawa in Ilala Municipality. The airport is located west of Dar es Salaam’s central business district.

Port

The Tanzania Ports Authority Head quarters

The city has the country’s busiest port: The port is located on the west of the Indian Ocean, Kurasini creek south east of Dar es Salaam’s central business District. The Port of Dar es Salaam handles 90{c6f977237d88cd3f624644ccdc7d4f0c8a849597ffa8ac7aad4e5b283943327c} of the country’s cargo. Due to huge influx of cargo and the slow pace of expansion a new cargo port 60 kilometres (37 miles) northwest of Dar es Salaam is proposed at Bagamoyo.

Tourism

A traditional Tanzanian hut in the Village Museum. Dar es Salaam has two of the five museums comprising the National Museum of Tanzania consortium, namely the National Museum proper and the Makumbusho Cultural Centre & Village Museum. The National Museum is dedicated to the history of Tanzania; most notably, it exhibits some of the bones of Paranthropus boisei that were among the findings of Louis Leakey at Olduvai. The Makumbusho Cultural Centre & Village Museum, located in the outskirts of the city on the road to Bagamoyo, showcases traditional huts from 16 different Tanzanian ethnic groups. There are also examples of traditional cultivations, and traditional music and dance shows are held daily. In 2016, there was a breakthrough discovery in Northern Tanzania by a scientist, from the University of Dar es Salaam, of footprints thought to be of a hominid that predates Homo sapiens. Close to the National Museum are also the botanical gardens, with tropical plants and trees. There are beaches on the Msasani peninsula north of Dar es Salaam and in Kigamboni to the south. Trips to the nearby islands of the Dar es Salaam Marine Reserve are a popular daytrip from the city and a spot for snorkeling, swimming and sunbathing. Bongoyo Island can be reached by boat from the Msasani Slipway.

Weather

Due to close proximity to the equator and the warm Indian Ocean, the city experiences tropical climatic conditions, typified by hot and humid weather throughout much of the year. It has a tropical wet and dry climate (Köppen: Aw). Annual rainfall is approximately 1,100 mm (43 in), and in a normal year there are two rainy seasons: “the long rains” in April and May and “the short rains” in November and December.